Category Archives: Product Roadmap

The most important thing you need for your product to succeed

Have you ever felt like there is no clear direction for your product?

That you keep getting jerked around building features to satisfy the latest customer opportunity?

That your product can do a lot of things, but it’s hard to articulate exactly what it does in just a few short sentences?

Maybe your product is trying too hard to be all things to all people?

Or maybe folks are constantly asking you why…

Why are we building these features?

Why are we selling to those customers?

Why is the customer wanting our product to do something else?

The reason for this often boils down to a simple truth:

The product lacks a coherent vision.

Having a product vision is quite possibly the most important thing you need for your product to succeed.

Yes, strategy is important.

Yes, execution is important.

But it all starts with having a vision for your product.

Without a product vision, how will you know where you’re going and why?

So every product starts with a vision to make it real. It’s foundational to the success of any product. It’s your north star. Without a coherent product vision, even a seemingly “great” product idea will fail in the market!

I decided to put my thoughts on this into a video.

So here it is. In it, I talk about:

  • What is a product vision.
  • Why it’s important.
  • How you can craft one for your product.

I cover this in depth in this video:

Creating a product vision doesn’t have to be hard. You don’t need to write some fancy vision statement, nor do you need torture yourself by trying to come up with the perfect elevator pitch.

You can actually start simply and immediately by defining four things:

  1. Who is your customer?
  2. What problem are you solving for them?
  3. What is your solution to that problem?
  4. What is your value proposition — i.e. that ultimate benefit you’re trying to deliver to your customer.

This is something you can do today. Right now. It can take less than 20 minutes. Even 5.

It doesn’t have to be perfect. It just needs to be done.

I talk about it in the video.

Over time, as you learn from the marketplace, as you learn from customers, you’ll refine the vision. That’s a good thing.

Watch the video, and when you’re done, please leave me a comment on what challenges you’ve had to face because your product lacked a proper product vision.

Then be sure to grab this quick fill-in-the-blank worksheet below to help you create the product vision for your next great product idea!

Grab Your Copy Of The Fill-In-The-Blank Product Vision Worksheet >>

No, I Can’t Give You A Roadmap For Our New Product (Yet)

Cartoon by Roger LathamA fellow product manager that’s working on a new product idea recently wrote to me:

“Common feedback I receive from our our engineers and executives is they don’t have a good grasp of the product vision. They say, “OK, that’s great, we can build that. But where are we going with this if we find the hypothesis to be true? What’s the long term vision for the product?” In essence, they’re asking what’s the end goal in 2-5 years, and if you show me that I’ll have a better sense of the architecture and tools I need to account for.”

This product manager is right at the very initial stages of their product idea, where he still needs to test the problem and solution hypotheses. But he’s already being asked for a long-term product roadmap! Sound familiar?

While the request may seem perfectly reasonable, it’s misplaced at such an early stage. The question about architecture and tools may also seem perfectly reasonable on the surface, but it’s a scale question, and is not the right one to be focusing on before you know if you’ve even identified the right customer problem and have proof that your solution approach is viable to solving that problem.

Execs are trying to assess the potential market opportunity, the underlying investment that will be needed, and the speed to achieving ROI. So naturally, they want to see the long-term roadmap. But at such an early stage, you’re likely in no position to be able to answer the question.

Even at the conceptual stage, you may have a list of potential features in your mind. You could prioritize them using one of the many scorecarding techniques written about by seasoned product practitioners. (See this, this, this, and this, to reference just a few.) These are all very valid techniques written by product folks who really know their stuff.

Doing that so early is a waste of time, though. Creating a product roadmap is predicated on having a coherent product strategy, which is predicated on having a validated understanding of who are your customers, what are their pain points, and whether they’ll find your solution valuable. If you don’t even know if customers will buy your solution, what’s the point in having a roadmap?

So when do you develop a roadmap for a new product?

For a startup product, the first step is always to identify the customer segment and customer problem. Quickly capture your product vision, formulate your customer, problem and solution hypotheses, and systematically test them. As you go along, you need to identify early adopters to whom you can deliver your solution — typically you build the product for these folks first. If practicable, test pricing at this stage as well.

Figure what you absolutely must deliver to these folks to solve their #1 problem, and work like hell to deliver it as quickly as possible. All other features get cut from scope and sit in the backlog.

After delivering this minimum viable product (MVP) you need to actively gain feedback from these early customers. You’re using your delivered product to gain deeper insights into the customer’s problem, and you’re trying to understand what you need to improve in the product to (1) get these customers to stick, and (2) attract more new customers.

In addition, now that you have an initial set of engaged customers, you can also try to test their second level set of problems or discover new ones. Understanding those problems may identify new enhancements and features. You’ll now be armed with a set of improvements, fixes and new ideas that you can put into the backlog.

If you have a sales force and have armed them to sell your MVP, make sure you’re actively gathering feedback from them as well. You may uncover opportunities to evolve your sales messaging and positioning. You may also uncover feature gaps. If so, you can put the into the backlog as well to earmark for further validation. Pay particular attention to customer feedback that’s preventing a customer sale.

You’ll have a pretty good backlog at this point, so you can now start building an initial roadmap. Start by prioritizing the backlog based on a reasonable customer-centric set of criteria. I typically skew my priorities heavily toward voice of customer (VOC) feedback. While at any stage of the product lifecycle, features should solve tangible customer problems, it’s even more important at this early stage.

Also factor in the company’s strategic goals. For example, if the company’s focus is retention, features that create stickiness may carry more weight; if the focus is growth through customer acquisition, then sellable features may be more important; if it’s expansion revenue — i.e., greater revenue from existing customers — features that drive engagement and up-sells may take priority.

Make some allowance for operational issues. You may not necessarily have a scale problem yet, so these type of issues should not take precedence over VOC or driving revenue; however, you don’t want to completely ignore technical debt or reasonable operational fixes.

Once you have a prioritized list, socialize it. (Read this post by Bruce McCarthy on using “shuttle diplomacy” to get buy-in.) For the top priority items on the list, get t-shirt sizing from Engineering, and make a final call to sequence out the items based on customer and business value vs. feasibility. Now you’ve got a validated product in the marketplace with a decent first-pass roadmap that you can build upon. Go forth and conquer!