How To Streamline Your Product Development Process

By Emily Hunter

Many businesses are sustained and driven by product development. From small businesses to multinational corporations, the creation of new products is vital to market survival, especially in a world where trends, likes, and dislikes appear to change on an almost daily basis. Because of the swiftly changing market, many businesses have looked for ways to make the standard development process a little faster, or at least a little smoother.

In standard product development, there are several stages in the process like idea generation, screening, commercialization, and so forth until the product is finally ready for launch. While this development process works well, and is still in use by a great many organizations, it doesn’t always foster quick change and a fast development cycle.

A Holistic Emphasis

Holistic processes, used by major companies in the United States and Japan, do not get rid of a company’s stages of development, but merge them. When the idea is born, for example, it might move through the development team before the screening team compares and contrasts it with new product-related ideas, but both ends work in conjunction with one another. Instead of moving through incremental stages, everyone simultaneously contributes until the product is done.

Today, when a product needs to be built before the next big thing comes along, flexibility is a must. Having more hands on deck during product development requires more trial and error than the standard linear method. However, it also necessitates more communication between departments, which fosters transparency and openness through every level in a company. Once everyone understands what the other departments do, they are far more likely to take advantage of cross-departmental collaboration, allowing the company as a whole to reap the benefits of teamwork.

A Little Push

As always, development begins with an idea. In many cases, it’s a very broad idea — one that requires limits to be stretched and tested. When ideas arise in big companies, they are usually generated and imposed from above, unlike small companies, which can think big and aim for something they’ve never tried before. The problem with “thinking big” is that big ideas are often daunting to execute in real life.

Naturally, the idea has to be feasible. It also has to have a time limit. It’s going to be challenging, so everyone involved will have to be pushed a little — by themselves, by management, by the other members of their team. Enforce deadlines, maintain high standards, and monitor the quality of work, but do so within reason. Too much pressure can destroy a team, but just the right amount can drive people to achieve accomplishments they never believed possible.

A Team of Their Own

Product development teams tend to be extremely independent. Basically, they are given a concept, and they build a design around that idea. If the people involved are qualified in their specializations, the project will gain a life of its own. If upper management is involved in starting this kind of team, they should remember that such an arrangement works better if they just stay out of it. Shifting already established parameters as the potential to destroy the entire process.

Over time, the team will develop its own personal goals in an effort to complete the task in the time allotted, often fostering a strong sense of unity through the shared task. In effect, management won’t have to move the goal posts because the team will do this on their own. With each victory inspiring them to further success, every challenge overcome will instigate another even more difficult challenge in a kind of snowball effect.

Streamline Appropriately

The process of streamlining product development is great for many companies, but it is not for everyone. A freeform creative process tends to involve a great deal of overtime. For instance, a team that is not willing to put in the extra creative hours to bring an idea to life would be better off with the standard, more stratified process. Likewise, the naturally unstable and flexible teamwork setting of a holistic development process is not conducive to a huge project involving hundreds of people.

Some companies are run by a single individual who basically invents the products on his or her own and then gives the specifications to a design team. In this cases, it’s best to simply design the product as ordered rather than trying to improve upon the design.

Dealing with Change

It’s not easy to do something different from the standard procedure, especially the “old way” is deeply engrained into a company’s routine practices. However, change is often necessary. A new streamlined product development process may feel a little strange at first, and it may seem like it’s not quite working, But every new process takes some getting used to. Whether it’s a new software program or new machinery, mastering an innovative new process typically produces fantastic results.

Emily Hunter has been writing about business topics for many years, and currently writes on behalf of the product development specialists at Pivot International. In her spare time, she cheers for Spirit of Atlanta, Carolina Crown and Phantom Regiment, creates her own sodas, and crushes tower defense games. Follow her on Twitter at @Emily2Zen.