Tag Archives: business model canvas

How to Identify (and Mitigate) the Riskiest Parts of Your Product Strategy

Any product strategy is fraught with risks.

Three of the biggest risks to a startup are tech risk, market risk, and ego risk. Corporate innovation faces additional risks: resource risk (resources need to be assigned), implementation risk (need the right implementation skill sets and tools), operational risk (the product needs to be operationally cost-effective) and internal risk (need buy-in and alignment from internal stakeholders).

Identifying these risks and de-risking them are crucial to the success of any product strategy. One of the most compelling things to me about Lean Startup is the focus on systematically de-risking elements of a product innovation through experiments and Validated Learning — one of the five core principles of Lean Startup.

Of course, this is predicated on identifying each of the most essential elements of your product vision. The Product Canvas has been great in helping me do just that. Its 1-page format facilitates having important conversations with my partners and stakeholders to gather their feedback.

“[The Product Canvas] is a smart way for each product manager to have a succinct snapshot of what it means to ‘be’ a product. It is a great way to focus and present to others the critical elements of a product.”

Having conversations with my internal partners are critical to helping me uncover risks and assumptions that I may not have thought of.

As I started doing this, the question became how to capture these risks, track progress in de-risking them, and communicate back that progress?

Here, again, is where I found the principle of Innovation Accounting from Lean Startup appealing, which Eric Ries describes it in his book:

To improve entrepreneurial outcomes, and to hold entrepreneurs accountable, we need to focus on the boring stuff: how to measure progress, how to setup milestones, how to prioritize work. This requires a new kind of accounting, specific to startups.

In other words, Innovation Accounting provides a framework to measure and communicate progress. The unit of progress is a learning milestone, “an alternative to traditional business and product milestones.” (From the book.)

This last part really appeals to me. Developing a grounded, workable product strategy cannot be moved forward by a date-driven approach, and I’ve seen too many new product development efforts descend into chaos, and even outright failure, by the traditional project management process.

Again, from Eric’s book:

“Learning milestones are useful for entrepreneurs as a way of assessing their progress accurately and objectively; they are also invaluable to managers and investors who must hold entrepreneurs accountable.”

I’d argue we could replace “entrepreneur” with “product manager” or “product innovator”, and “investors” with “executives”.

But again, the question is how to actually do this in practice. Let’s go back to the issue of capturing and tracking assumptions and risks.

At first, I used stickies:

pmc_hypotheses_1_lowrez

That worked great as a start. Especially for brainstorming or a live update if a colleague or stakeholder was in the room with me.

But not so much for tracking ongoing progress. Plus, translating all that into an update report to share with someone not in the room is just too much work, quite frankly.

I needed something that doubled up as a tool to use and a way to communicate progress, similar to the Product Canvas.

Then I came across Ash Maurya’s blog posts on his Lean Stack approach to doing Innovation Accounting. I liked how he’s mapped the Build-Measure-Lean cycle into a Kanban style approach to track his progress.

After experimenting with his approach, I developed a version that worked for me as a product manager. I’ll explain via a made up, yet tangible, example.

Below is an initial Product Canvas for an online bill payment app that allows customers of a bank to view all their bills in one place and pay directly through their bank account.

billpay-product-canvas

Now, as product manager, I should be intimate with my customer base. So let’s say their input was the genesis for this product — e.g., lots of customer requests asking to enhance the existing bill pay service with the ability to view and pay utility bills.

As such, initially I may not see my Customer Segment or Problems as the highest risks. But I do need to identify my early adopters.

In other words, I feel confident in the initial demand, but I’m not certain which of my customers will be most likely to switch their behavior to paying all their bills through our bank. (After all, people don’t always do what they say.) So I highlight this as a risk.

After speaking with my stakeholders, I identified numerous additional risks, which I highlight via PowerPoint’s comments feature:

billpay-product-canvas-with-comments1

All I need to do is click on any comment to view the details:

billpay-product-canvas-with-open-comments

Now, to track and communicate progress on how risks are being addressed, I use a Kanban style board similar to what Ash uses, called the Validated Learning Board.

billpay-validated-learning-board

Risks and assumptions are placed in the Backlog column. When I begin working on a particular risk card, I move the card to the IN PROGRESS section. I place a blue card under the Build column to note the experiment I’m conducting. On the card, I note the experiment that I’m running and the falsifiable hypothesis of my experiment.

If an experiment serves to tackle more than one risk, no problem. You’ll see an example in the image above representing that.

Once I start the experiment (e.g., interview the first customer, or day 1 of user testing, etc.), I move the card to the Measure column.

Once the experiment is over, I move the risk card to the Learn/DONE column, and color code it green if the assumption has been validated or risk de-risked, and red if not.

If I’m running multiple experiments simultaneously, I separate them with a line.

billpay-validated-learning-board-2

I don’t capture all the details of my experiment on the cards. This is meant for a high-level progress view. Details of the experiment can be presented on its own slide or report.

Finally, I need to make sure I’m systematically identifying the right set of internal stakeholders and capturing their feedback. I covered that in my blog post on Stakeholder Development, in which I talked about the Stakeholder Development Tracker.

As I continue to get feedback from both the experiments and further internal conversations, I use these learnings to update the product strategy represented in the Product Canvas.

A team can use these artifacts to track progress on, say, the wall of an agile room, while also quickly converting them into 3 quick slides to provide a high-level update to anyone on the progress of the product strategy.

How I Document My Product Vision

Over the last many years, I’ve been experimenting with applying Lean Startup andThe Lean Startup Customer Development concepts to product management. I first wrote about this here. Some time ago, I wrote about the challenges I and other product professionals have faced with the traditional approach of writing a business case.

One area where I had always struggled with was finding a simple and quick way to sketch out my product ideas. I used PowerPoint, Word, Google Docs, but they never really worked effectively. Often times my original notes would grow into a bloated morass of detailed thoughts about features, customers, marketing, partnerships, technologies, etc. There was no structure. Worst of all, if I wanted to share them with someone, I’d have to spend time figuring out how to translate them into something readable, since no one would be able to decipher my chicken scratch.

Before writing a requirements doc or business case, what I really wanted was a way to not only quickly capture a product idea in a structured manner, but also use the same format to share it with others to elicit feedback.

So you can imagine my delight when I came across Alex Osterwalder’s Business Model Canvas several years ago.

Business Model Canvas

What’s great about it is since it’s a single page, one can quickly jot down the basics of any business model, and it’s easy to share and more likely to get read than a PowerPoint deck or a Word doc. The single page also forces brevity: there isn’t a lot of space for a laundry list of features – you need to distil down your idea to its most essential building blocks.

Love at first sight, I started trying to use it for my products. But I ran into a few challenges. I found that while it does a good job capturing the key elements of a business, it’s not as customer focused as I would have liked because there was no place to capture the customer problems I was trying to solve or identify potential early adopters. There was also no place to capture my envisioned solution, and I often got confused between Channels and Customer Relationships.

That’s when I came across Ash Maurya’s Lean Canvas, an adaptation of the Business Model Canvas he created for his web startups.

Lean Canvas

Ash has correctly put the focus on customers and their problems. I also like that he calls out Unfair Advantage, which to me means competitive differentiation. This is especially true for a startup that may be fighting bigger, more established players.

So I started using his Lean Canvas, but ran into a new set of problems as a product manager:

Resources: Ash has left this out from Alex’s original version. I can understand this with respect to startups, but as a product manager working in an organization, it was important to me to identify which resources – platforms, systems, departments, vendors, etc. – I would need to make my product idea a reality.

Readability: When walking someone through a product or business idea, my inclination is always to start with the market opportunity, which means customers, their problems, and how we can solve them. I found neither of the above two canvases easily lend themselves to that flow. I’d have to start at the right-most column and then jump back left. This is non-intuitive to most English-speaking readers, and I found I’d quickly lose my audience as I criss-crossed columns.

Two other challenges I ran into as a product manager:

Stakeholders: Product Managers have to deal with internal stakeholders. The larger the org, the more. Often times a new product idea needs an executive sponsor. In my experience, I’ve found that the more I’m mindful of who are my key stakeholders, the greater the chance of internal support for my product.

Non-Revenue “Products”: Some products managers are responsible for initiatives that aren’t directly revenue generating, but do provide tangible business value, like improving CSAT, driving referrals, etc. I’ve lead several like that.

So I decided to create my own iteration that I felt was more suitable to me as a product manager, that I call the Product Canvas:

This version puts the customer and market on the left-hand side, which not only addresses the readability issue but also supports more intuitively how I think through a product opportunity. I can start with the customer and their problems on the left, and work my way toward the right to ultimately figure out how I’m going to deliver on the solution.

Here’s a brief description of each block and the order in which I typically approach them:

1. Customer Segment: Who is the target customer of our proposed product? This could be the company’s entire customer base, a segment, or a new market or vertical. Ash recommends using a separate Lean Canvas for each segment where one has multiple segments in mind, and I think that’s good advice as a starting point.

1a. Early Adopters: For any new product opportunity, it’s important to identify early adopters. There is already a ton written about this. While identifying early adopters is implied in the Lean Canvas, I wanted it called out explicitly, as I’ve found even in existing organizations there is a tendency to think any new product idea is applicable to all customers.

2. Problem: A brief description of the top problems we’re addressing. I try to limit this to at most 3.

2a. Existing Alternatives: How is the customer solving this problem today? This may not be just direct competitors. For example, in the early days, Quicken’s competition was not only other accounting software, but also checkbooks, and pen and paper.

3. Unique Value Proposition: How are we uniquely going to solve our customers’ problem(s)? This is the elevator pitch: the one sentence that clearly states the value we’re providing to our target customers.

4. Solution: What are the most essential features of our solution that will deliver on our UVP? This is not an exhaustive feature list. I try to limit it to the top 3 elements of my proposed solution.

5. Channels: How will we get (acquire), keep (retain), and grow (sell more to existing) customers? What is the marketing and sales strategy?

6. Revenue Streams/Business Value: How will we make money? What’s our pricing strategy? If this is not a revenue generating product, what other business value is it providing? Improving customer satisfaction? Customer lifetime value? Market positioning? Competitive differentiation? Operational efficiencies?

7. Key Metrics or Success Factors: What are the most important metrics that will tell us that we’re successful? Signups? Conversions? Referrals? CSAT? NPS? These are the metrics that are driving #6 above.

8. Key Resources: What are the most critical internal resources we need? These could be platforms, systems, business processes, departments. Are there external partners we need to rely on?

9. Cost Structure: What are the key cost drivers? Software/IT development? Customer acquisition? Account management? Hiring and talent development? This is also a good place to capture a back-of-the-envelope break-even calculation.

10. Unfair Advantage: This is the distinctive competence or advantage that your product has over other solutions in the marketplace. It’s something your product does better than any other, something that can’t be easily copied. It could be intimate knowledge of an industry, personal authority or brand, a business process or competence, a patent, or some other intellectual property.

After experimenting with using this Product Canvas as a product manager, I started sharing it with folks, asking them to use it, and the feedback has been very encouraging.

Feel free to download it here.