Tag Archives: customer interview

The Top Strategies For Doing Customer Interviews That Get You Real Insights

We all know a core responsibility of a product manager is to constantly and consistently bring the customer perspective into the business.

That means customer interviewing is a critical skill for every product manager.

I must admit, earlier in my career I totally sucked at it.

I had no plan. I often just winged it. I asked the wrong questions. I was a poor listener. I talked more and listened less. I tended to get too excited about my product idea and go into pitch mode instead of focusing on the customer’s problems. And I was very guilty of confirmation bias.

Fortunately, with lots of practice, over time I got better. As I did, I accumulated a list of the best strategies that I use even today to conduct an interview that helps me extract real customer insights.

Get the Entire List of 25 Customer Interview Strategies >>

So in this video I share 5 of the best customer interview strategies:

Use these 5 powerful tips to supercharge your customer interviews to extract every ounce of goodness from them:

  1. Set an objective. Know what you want to get out of the interview — that is, what is it you want to learn and come away with?
  2. Have a script. Having a script will help guide your interview with the customer, be better prepared and purposeful in your interviewing, and make sure you achieve the objective you’ve set out.
  3. Ask “Why?” — a lot. This is by far the most important question in your arsenal. It allows you to go deep, get inside the mind of your customer, understand their motivations, get to the true nature of the problem they’re trying to solve, and how they actually value their solutions.
  4. Ask for examples. Asking for an example forces your customer to get specific rather than speak in generalities, giving you tangible evidence of a customer’s problem, and allowing you to momentarily “live in their world”.
  5. Focus on listening. Cannot stress this enough! The biggest thing you can do is to TALK LESS AND LISTEN MORE. Your purpose is to get THEIR perspective — not promote your point of view, explain yourself, defend your idea or debate. The only times you should look to speak is when you need to clarify something or need to ask a follow-up question.

Get the Entire List of 25 Customer Interview Strategies >>

Follow these strategies and you’ll become a pro at conducting truly insightful customer interviews.

Watch the video above, download the full list of customer interview strategies, and please share in the comments below what strategies you’ve developed to conduct truly insightful customer interviews.

Guidelines For Conducting A Customer Conversation Session

By Prashanth Padmanabhan

There are some basic principles that you can follow while telling your story to your customer.

1. Show up at the customer’s office, if you can.

It shows respect. It tells them that you care for their thought. It is money well spent. As a product manager or product designer you are the voice of the customer and that is your only advantage over every other function. So customer visits should be your number one priority. Nothing else is more important than that.

2. Always show a prototype or draw a picture on the white board.

Don’t show a set of slides. This forces participants to think differently, look at the prototype and imagine rather than go into a passive finger-pointing mode. The prototype must include a list of concepts that you want to confront them with for feedback. Organize those concepts in the form of a story you can tell by going through the different screens in the prototype. Pause for a few seconds after each concept is outlined and let the interviewees share their thoughts. Acknowledge any interesting thoughts that come up and move on to the next concept in the story.

3. After introductions, ask them what they plan to get out of the session, and write that down on a flip chart.

If the crowd is large, ask everyone they plan to participate or if they are merely there to observe. Differentiate between the participants and observers and direct the conversation to the participants.

4. Listen more. Speak less.

You should be talking for about ten percent of the time and listening for the reminder of the time. If you have a hard time keeping quiet, take on the role of the writer on the flip chart. This will help you talk less and listen more. It will force you to keep quiet and will nudge customers to think aloud and direct you writing.

5. Write or draw on a flip chart.

Don’t sit down in a chair and write in a notebook where no one can see what you are writing. Writing on a flip chart, conveys to customers that you are listening, synthesizing and are open for comments. They can see your thought process, point out gaps in your thinking and, if necessary, correct what you write. So take notes publicly. Not privately.

Tip: Avoid total silence when in a conference! If you are running a workshop via conference, while taking notes, please avoid silence. Tell the customer you’re taking notes so they know you are listening.

6. Display all the flips charts all the time.

Do not flip the chart over and go to a new page. Tear the paper you wrote on and tape it to a wall. Don’t worry. Customers do not mind you posting 4-5 flip charts on the walls of their conference rooms. Pausing to tape the flip chart paper on the wall will give you a logical break after about 15-20 minutes of conversation. If your colleagues are present, it will give them an opportunity to chime in. It will also give you a minute to collect your thoughts.

After your paste the flip chart on the wall, underline the key words in the notes, recap the conversation, point out who said what, and ask participants if you missed anything. It gives participants an opportunity to point of simple errors that are bothering them.

7. Document while at the session.

Not after you come back to the office. Use a (phone) camera to take a picture of all the flip board charts. That is you documentation. You don’t have to write elaborate notes after you come back from the session. Post the pictures to a collaboration site, such as Streamwork, SuccessFactors JAM, Yammer or SharePoint, along with the notes and share it with customers.

8. Capture customer quotes and share them with colleagues rather than writing elaborate reports. Your colleagues will appreciate the quotes from customers and users.

Prashanth Padmanabhan is an entrepreneur, product designer, collaboration enthusiast, product manager for people and work management software, and SAP mentor. He’s co-authored two books, SAP Enterprise Learning and Look & Flow, a book on product innovation using design thinking and storytelling. His blog is Journal on Product Design and Development.
This post was originally published on Look and Flow, the blog site for his book. It is reprinted here with permission.