Tag Archives: intrapreneur

How A Rusting Giant Can Act More Like A Startup

This is a Q&A with Trevor Owens, Founder of Javelin, by Adam L. Penenberg originally published on PandoDaily, and re-printed here with Trevor’s permission.

Why should big companies emulate startups?

Back in the day, everyone wanted to work at a place like IBM. Today corporations are viewed as stodgy. Many of us don’t know what they do anymore and even if we did, we probably wouldn’t care. These bloated companies with their thousands of workers trapped within walls of bureaucracies aren’t growing anymore. In fact, their markets are shrinking.

The time between the birth, growth, and death of a large enterprise has shrunk dramatically over the years. Of the companies listed on the Fortune 500 in 1955, nearly 87 percent of them have either gone bankrupt, merged, reverted to private ownership, or lost enough gross revenue to be delisted. A study of the S&P 500, which ranks companies by market cap, found the average age of a business on the list was 61 years in 1958 but only 18 years in 2012. In the past, being big was in itself a defensible position. Now it’s not.

Contrast that with the frenetic growth and buzz surrounding successful startups. Instagram employed just 12 people when it sold for $1 billion. Snapchat had about 30 people when Facebook offered to snatch it up $3 billion. Whatsapp employed 50 or 60 people when it sold for $19 billion.

Big companies see this, and feel the cultural pull away from them. They’re starved for growth. If they want to compete, they have to become more like startups. Otherwise they’re in jeopardy of disappearing all together.

Why do big companies have trouble innovating?

When a company gets big, bureaucracy is layered throughout. In some ways it’s a necessary part of growth. The reason it exists is so the company doesn’t fall apart. The more people you have working for you, the more you need to manage them to ensure they get the support they need to do their jobs. Then you have whole divisions that exist simply to produce and sell, and their heads aren’t interested in new ideas, products, or ways to do things that could interfere with their bottom line, because that’s how they’re judged and compensated.

Couple all that with the main goal of a company, which is to serve existing customers. That’s where the resources go. Corporations offer an environment of execution and maintenance but not innovation, and rely on good management to target their best customers and deliver better products. That’s fine when they’ve identified and mastered their markets, but they get disrupted when a new entrant comes along that can deliver a good enough product at much lower cost of higher convenience. New entrants target low-value customers then quickly climb the value chain with a better cost structure. Think Netflix versus Blockbuster or Napster invading the recording industry.

Part of issue is there’s no management philosophy built around how to innovate within a large enterprise. With new companies we have the Lean Startup Method, which offers a framework for constantly improving a product to find the best product-market fit before you actually go into production or invest gobs of money in creating any infrastructure. This is the first time we’ve had a repeatable process. But there is no analog for large companies. They have to develop some basic structures just to deploy lean startup methods.

How are some big companies innovating like startups?

There are two parts to innovating like a startup. One is generating a flow of high-quality (i.e. validated) ideas. We call this “innovation flow” — similar to the idea of deal flow for venture capitalists. If a VC doesn’t have good deal flow he won’t get returns.  The other is the need to create a structure to incubate these ideas called an “innovation colony.”

Intuit does the first part well. It kind of copied our lean startup workshop and scaled it throughout the company. After employees have been trained in lean startup methods and know how to validate ideas, they can take advantage of unstructured time (also known as 10 percent time) to work on any project they want to validate that can potentially become a successful new product. If they find they have something they can go to their boss for funding, and this has led to some viable products, including Sparkrent.

Facebook is famous for hackathons. That’s where the Timeline was first imagined. Employees can work on anything that relates to the company’s products and deliver a down-and-dirty prototype during a 24-hour hackathon. Companies like Nordstrom are becoming sophisticated at lean startup methods. It runs weeklong experiments. One from 2011 involved an iPad app that helps users choose eyeglass frames and another addressed the physical design of its retail stores.

Companies also acquire startups to “buy growth,” although few buy at the right time. One that did was Twitter, which acquired Vine before it launched, left it alone to carry on its mission without interference, and it ended up a great acquisition. Vine clearly had product/market fit right out of the gate.

What about skunkworks, innovation labs, and intrapreneur programs?

For large companies there are three traditional innovation structures:

First, there’s skunkworks, when you hire a bunch of smart people to work on pie-in-the-sky technologies. Motorola, for example, hired away a former head of DARPA to run its skunkworks. It only works on highly technical products with low market risk — like a faster jet plane or Amazon Web Services. It’s not good for developing, say, an app like The Daily and it won’t help you find a market or determine product-market fit.

Then there are innovation labs. Perhaps the best known was Xerox Parc, which was the original Innovation Lab. It came up with brilliant ideas but failed to commercialize them — until Steve Jobs came along and borrowed (some say stole) them. Innovation labs that focus on innovative technologies are known to struggle with commercialization.

Finally, you have intrapreneur programs, which are the latest fad: a four- or eight-week program where employees take time off, explore some ideas and a product, and have to sell it to a business unit within the company.  The issue comes back to the incentives inherent in successful business units. They resist ideas they didn’t come up with, no matter how big their potential. They favor incremental innovation that won’t cannibalize their own sales over something that could change their industry for the better.

As a corollary you can have something we recommend: innovation colonies. This is a way for companies to create a fund to invest in ideas their employees have. To participate, though, the employee has to give up the security of their jobs in exchange for equity in the venture. Microsoft, Kaplan, Nike, Barclays, and Disney are just some of the companies utilizing innovation colonies.

Here’s how they work: Employees pitch their ideas, which have been validated, get funding, and own a majority of the equity in these products in the seed stage. They work with other entrepreneurs and the company offers advisement, mentoring and other resources. They seek to develop products, take them to market, and if they gain any traction they can raise a series A with outside investors. They run the company without interference from the Mother ship. In the end, the big company can offer to buy their startups back. The magic is that the entrepreneurs are incentivized to build a real business.

Is it a good idea to offer equity stakes within corporate environments?

Oh, yes. In fact, we advocate for employees to get equity on their projects. Let me emphasize that I mean equity in the product, not the company. Equity attracts the best people because entrepreneurs are motivated by achievement and autonomy and are willing to take less in salary in exchange for more upside in their ideas. Of course, they want to see millions from their products, if they’re successful, but it’s not just about money; it’s what it represents. It’s about being recognized for your achievements. Face it: you have to be a little crazy to be an entrepreneur. This is the whole point of the innovation colony structure.

If you don’t give employees who are entrepreneurially minded equity in their projects they’ll leave to start their own companies. This happens even at innovation-friendly environments like Google: Ev Wiliams (Twitter), Kevin Systrom (Instagram), Dennis Crowley (Foursquare) all left to launch their own ventures. It’s unfortunate that Google doesn’t share in any of the billions they’ve created.

Not only do you want to hire the best and brightest, you want them to stick around and create the kinds of innovative products and services that will also ensure your company sticks around for the long term. Some large companies make the mistake of addressing a problem by simply throwing 15 developers at a problem thinking it will lead to something. Instead, great ideas come from all over an organization and may even seem like bad ideas at first until you validate them.

Once a company realizes this, anything is possible.

Trevor Owens is a thought leader on Lean Startup. He is the Founder of Javelin, a provider of tools and services to learn, launch and track new business ideas, and Lean Startup Machine, a three-day workshop that teaches entrepreneurs and innovators how to build startup products. He has a new book called The Lean Enterprise that talks about how to bring the startup mindset to larger organizations.

MVP buy-in

One of the biggest challenges product innovators in established companies face in defining an MVP is getting buy-in from internal stakeholders.

These could be senior execs, peers, other departments, partners, or even your boss.

You might say, “This is all about politics, and that just comes in the way of innovation.” That’s being naive.

You might say, “Consensus driven product development kills creativity and innovation.” You’d be right, but I’m by no means advocating a “decision by committee” approach.

You might say, “Internally defined products with no customer input leads to lousy products that fail in the market.” That statement is correct. I 100% agree with it. But it’s not the whole picture.

The reality is that product managers and corporate product innovators have multiple internal constituents to manage.

It is imperative that they somehow make everyone feel a part of the process. Else, they risk their product idea being run over, shelved, sidelined, destroyed before it’s even left the concept stage.

Lack of stakeholder traction can often be a bigger roadblock than customer traction.

I call these folks internalvangelists.

So how do you get internal traction on your product idea? How do you get buy-in on your customder-driven MVP without it getting railroaded by others?

How do you build traction internally and develop these internalvangelists?

You use good old fashion product management techniques. Specifically, by leveraging a process every Product Manager should know: roadmap prioritization.

My friend, Bruce McCarthy, has talked about the 5 pillars of roadmaps, the first 3 of which are:

  1. Setting strategic goals
  2. Objective prioritization
  3. Shuttle diplomacy

These same pillars can be used for defining an MVP and getting stakeholder buy-in.

Setting Strategic Goals

The first step is to capture your product strategy. You can use the Product Canvas to get started.

What’s great about the Product Canvas is it allows you to document your vision in a simple, portable and shareable way on just a single page. The trick is to be concise. The intent isn’t to capture every nuance of the customer’s problems, nor detailed requirements. Just stick to the top 3-5 problems and the top 3-5 key elements of your solution.

This forces you to not only sharpen your thinking, but also your communication with stakeholders. This, in turn, encourages more constructive feedback, which is what you really need at this stage.

Objective Prioritization

You’ve probably received a lot of internal input (solicited and unsolicited) on features for your product. Most have probably been articulated as “must-have’s” for one reason or another. Of course, you know that most of them are probably not really needed at this early stage, certainly not for an MVP.

To quote from the book Getting Real by the founders of Basecamp: “Make features work hard to be implemented. Each feature must prove itself.” For an MVP, each feature must be tied to tangibly solving a top customer problem.

Bruce discusses using a scorecard type system to objectively prioritize features for product roadmapping — in particular, assigning a value metric for a feature’s contribution toward the product’s business goals, and balancing it against a level-of-effort (LOE) metric. The exercise can easily be done in a spreadsheet or using almost any product management software.

A similar approach can be used to prioritize the features for your MVP:

1. Rank each Problem documented in your Product Canvas in terms of your understanding of what is the customer’s top-most problem to be solved, followed by the second, etc.

2. Map Solution elements to Problems. These may not necessarily be one-to-one, as sometimes multiple elements of your Solution may work together to solve a particular customer problem.

3. For each Solution element, identify if it’s a “must-have” for your MVP. Solution elements meant to solve customer Problem #1 are automatically must-have’s. The trick is in making the determination for the remaining Problem/Solution mixes.

4. Identify all features for each Solution element. If you already have a list of feature ideas, this becomes more of a mapping exercise. The net result is every feature idea will be mapped directly back to a specific Problem, which is awesome.

5. Mark each feature as “In MVP” or not. Be ruthless in asking if a feature really, really needs to be part of the MVP. (Tip: not every feature under a “must-have” Solution element necessarily needs to be “In MVP”.)

6. “T-shirt size” the LOE for each feature, if practical. Just L/M/S at this point. A quick conversation with your engineering lead can give you this.

Like with roadmap prioritization, this entire exercise can also be done via a simple spreadsheet. Here’s a template I’ve used that you can freely download.

The beauty of the spreadsheet is it brings into sharp focus a particular feature’s contribution toward solving customers’ primary problems. And an MVP must attempt to do exactly that.

Shuttle Diplomacy

To paraphrase Bruce from p26 of his presentation, this is probably the most important part of the process.

You need to get buy-in from your key stakeholders for your product strategy and MVP definition to be approved and “stick over time”. Bruce shares some excellent tips on how to do this on pp26-30.

When you practice shuttle diplomacy:

“A magical thing happens. ‘Your’ plan becomes their plan too. This makes [review and approval] more of a formality, because everyone has had a hand in putting together the plan.”

To be clear, you’re not looking for “decision by committee”.

As the product owner, you will still be looked upon as the final decision maker. (Remember to stand your ground). But you need to actively try to bring others along by encouraging input and providing visibility.

Lean Startup purists may vomit at this, but that ignores the realities of getting things done in an established company as a product manager. As Henry Chesbrough writes:

“You have to fight — and win — on two fronts (both outside and inside), in order to succeed in corporate venturing.”

This means corporate innovators “must work to retain support over time as conflicts arise (which they will).”

This means Stakeholder Development. And that requires shuttle diplomacy.

Download the MVP Definition Template for product managers for free.