Tag Archives: non-technical co-founder

4 Key Tips For Attracting A Non-Technical Co-Founder

Recently Michael Hughes of CoFoundersLab wrote a nice piece on how a non-technical founder can attract a technical co-founder. I’ve read many similarly written blogs and presentations. Most all say the same type of thing: build a prototype, learn to write code, talk to customers. So I thought it would be interesting to look at the opposite situation: how can a technical founder attract a non-technical co-founder?

It strikes me that you could take many of Michael’s points and apply them equally to attracting a non-technical co-founder. Especially the ones about focusing on attracting a co-founder as opposed to finding one, getting into the right mind set, and a co-founder wanting to work with you instead of for you.

In fact, you could take many of his sentences and simply turn them back around to a technical founder. For example: “Repeat this to yourself until you believe it in your bones”: your idea isn’t the best idea, and a non-technical co-founder doesn’t want to work for you on simply selling your idea.

I’ve come across too many technical founders who see the problem as simply a question of sales. In their minds, they of course have the most brilliant product idea, and they may even have spent weeks or months building a product with slick features. Now, all they need is a “sales guy”, “marketing guy” or “business guy”, and of course the money will come rolling in.

If the product doesn’t sell, it’s easy for the technical founder to simply blame the sales guy or marketing guy. After all, clearly the product is great, so if it’s not selling it’s obviously sales or marketing’s fault!

Michael rightly says: “You may very well have the next game changing idea, but that’s missing the point.” The missing point in this case for the technical founder is market validation.

With all of the education out there about customer development, talking to customers, “get out of the building”, etc., I still meet many technical founders who are so completely convinced of their product idea, and they’ve spent months and even lots of money to build a product, yet have no proof whatsoever that a single customer would actually be interested in, let alone buy, their product. That’s because they’ve spent zero time in the marketplace actually trying to identify who their target customer may be and whether these customers actually care. Often times their market research has been limited to a few conversations with trusted friends and family, or they rely on broad industry research or market trends. But unless friends and family are your target customers, their opinions, while interesting and ego-flattering, are utterly irrelevant.

Technical founders are sometimes surprised when non-technical co-founders start providing input into the product features. Reality check: if they’re out there talking to prospective customers, they’re absolutely going to come back with input on features and capabilities that they feel need to be developed to satisfy your customers.

So how do you attract a potential co-founder? You can start with these four tips:

1. Make sure you’ve identified a real problem.

An idea is worthless unless you can clearly articulate who is your potential customer and what problem it solves for them. And you need to be able to state the problem from the customer’s point of view.

If a technical co-founder looks to a prototype or code as a form of commitment from a non-technical founder, a non-technical co-founder is looking for work done to obtain actual market validation as a form of commitment from a technical founder. Currency here is in the form of actual customer interviews.

2. Learn to do customer development.

If you want to gain respect from a non-technical co-founder, learn to how to find and interview customers, identify early adopters, understand your market, and get buyers. This will show that you haven’t formed your idea or developed your product simply in your head, but you’ve done so in response to the demands of your market. Nothing is more impressive than being able to clearly articulate who is your early adopter customer, and better yet, show that you have a paying early adopter customer.

3. Start talking about your product in terms of benefits, not features.

When describing their product ideas, many technical founders describe a laundry list of features. While some of your features may actually be pretty cool, the reality is no one actually cares. What customers really care about is how your product solves their problems, and that means being able to communicate in benefits, not features.

If you’ve done #1 and #2, #3 becomes easier to do. If you’re able to speak in terms of benefits, you will demonstrate to a non-technical co-founder a grounded, realistic understanding of your market.

4. Stop saying “There is nothing like this out there” or (worse) “There is no competition.”

Sorry to burst your bubble, but odds are very high your idea is not that unique. Repeat this to yourself: There is always competition for my product.

Keep in mind the competition may not always be another company or product. Your competition may very well be how customers are solving their problem today. A great example is Quicken. One of the biggest competitors Quicken was competing with when it first launched was the paper checkbook and pen. Your biggest competition is often current customer behavior.

Just like Michael says in his article, remember to treat your non-technical partner like a true partner, not just the person who will “get sales”. The key to attracting world talent here is to show commitment to obtaining real, tangible progress in your target market. Best of luck!